Sports Massage & Therapy

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Helps reduce aches and pains

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Great way to prevent injury and restore tissue health

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Increase your muscular flexibility

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FLATFOOT (Pes Planus)

A fallen arch or flatfoot is known medically as pes planus. This is when the foot loses the gently curving arch on the inner side of the sole, just in front of the heel.

Anatomically the longitudinal arch is supported by a ligament known as the long plantar ligament which acts as both a supportive and connective structure for the muscles of the foot to attach to known as the plantar fascia.

With flatfoot the longitudinal arch is flatter to the surface. As a result the foot and ankle complex have to work harder to support the body during weight bearing resulting in pain and discomfort ūüėę

Tag a friend and share if you anyone whose suffers with this. This week will look at ways to combat this through exercise and treatment.
... See MoreSee Less

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Sports Massage and Therapy

Sports massages are designed to release muscle tension and restore balance to the musculo-skeletal system, the benefits can be immense and include both physical, physiological and improvements.

Sports massage involves the manipulation & rehabilitation of soft tissues within the body, such as muscles, tendons and ligaments. Sports Massage Therapists have developed specific techniques which ensure that each massage delivers effective and efficient results.

Before considering the potential benefits sport massage has to offer, it is important to recognise that massage itself is not only for injured individuals but can also offer numerous benefits to uninjured individuals who are looking to enhance their sporting performance.

Physical benefits

Enhanced tissue permeability: Massage causes the tissue membrane pores to widen, allowing fluids and nutrients to pass through more readily. This enables waste products such as lactic acid to be removed rapidly and creates an environment whereby oxygen and nutrients are quickly delivered to the target muscles, allowing an enhanced recovery.

Increased flexibility: Massage stretches muscle tissue in a multidirectional manner, both longitudinally and laterally. It can also have a similar effect on the muscular sheath and surrounding fascia, allowing a beneficial release of stored tension and pressure.

Scar tissue realignment: Each and every time a muscle receives trauma or injury, scar tissue is formed which can affect the muscle itself as well as the tendons and ligaments. If not treated correctly at the time of injury, this scar tissue can form haphazardly, resulting in the potential for long term inflexibility issues. Massage assists in realigning the scar tissue formation and reduces the likelihood of subsequent injury and/or pain.

Enhanced micro circulation: Massage enhances the blood flow to the tissues of the target muscles in a similar manner to exercise. In addition to this, massage also causes blood vessels to dilate enabling oxygen and nutrients to pass through more readily.

Physiological Benefits

Inhibition of pain: A combination of tension and waste products within a muscle can often result in the sensation of pain. Massage lessons this painful feeling by its ability to reduce tension and remove waste products. It also encourages the release of endorphins.

Stimulates relaxation response: Massage creates an environment whereby heat generation, enhanced circulation and increased flexibility are all promoted, all of these factors play a role in stimulating mechanoreceptors in the body and creating relaxation.

Frequently asked questions

How does sports/ deep tissue and remedial massage differ from normal massage?

Sports and Remedial massage is applied with your goals in mind exploring what you need and then applying the relevant technique(s) necessary. These vary from: finding muscle imbalances which may be the cause of your current issue and offering remedial exercises to correct them; questions about your sports equipment or mechanism of injury; along with treating the tissues which are crying out for attention. Your goals may vary depending on whether you are carrying an injury or needing to bring your legs back to life for your next training session.

How long do sessions last?

You can book sessions from 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 90 minutes. The duration of the treatment will vary depending on how long you require and want condition the muscular tissues are in.

What happens during a treatment?

A brief history is taken prior to the massage including your sports goals or event deadlines. We may do some standing tests and no doubt will review your posture (this we can do with your clothes on if preferred). The majority of our treatment is hands-on work, however we want to fix you, so may glean as much information from you so we can work out what’s going on.

I don't play sports - can I still have a Sports Massage?

Yes, overuse injuries can occur in everyday life and are generally brought on by the things we do repetitively everyday. We will use remedial massage to treat you and look at what day to day activities could be the cause and will give you simple solutions to help with this. Generally making a few small changes can have a big effect.

How many massage treatments will I need?

If you are in pain or suffering from tension, this is variable from patient to patient and depends largely on the problem you are presenting with. Sometimes pain can be caused by straightforward short term problems that resolve very quickly in as few as one or two treatments. Others may take more time up to five or six treatments and some cases may require ongoing treatment for life. It depends on how long the patient has had the problem for and the length of time left before getting help. It is impossible to loosen years of built up tension in thirty minutes. For the best results it is advisable to continue your care until discharged and come for regular check ups to keep pain free.

For sports-specific massage, most runners, cyclists, gym goers or people who exercise regularly schedule at least a monthly up to a twice weekly sports massage to maintain the body for optimum performance. It may be that you prefer a massage treatment on a lighter training day as this allows the treatment to be focused on any specific muscular problems or specific tightness and gives suitable recovery time before the next session of exercise or sport. Alternatively you may prefer to schedule a massage after, for example a long run to help boost your recovery and maximise performance throughout the rest of your training week.

What should I wear?

We use towels during the treatment and would require that you keep your underwear on, however if you feel more comfortable, you can bring a pair of shorts. Stretchy underwear is best, especially if we are treating legs.

Sports Massage

Session Price
90min Sports Massage
£90
60min Sports Massage
£60
30min Sports Massage
£45

* Discounted prices are available for block bookings for a course of sports massages

Make a Sports Massage and Therapy Enquiry

Wednesday we go again! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

To stay actively fit and healthy we are advised by experts to walk 10,000 steps on average a day. But what if our feet are not bio mechanically efficient enough to support this? ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

#mondaymotivation Make it a good one guys ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

FLATFOOT (Pes Planus)

A fallen arch or flatfoot is known medically as pes planus. This is when the foot loses the gently curving arch on the inner side of the sole, just in front of the heel.

Anatomically the longitudinal arch is supported by a ligament known as the long plantar ligament which acts as both a supportive and connective structure for the muscles of the foot to attach to known as the plantar fascia.

With flatfoot the longitudinal arch is flatter to the surface. As a result the foot and ankle complex have to work harder to support the body during weight bearing resulting in pain and discomfort ūüėę

Tag a friend and share if you anyone whose suffers with this. This week will look at ways to combat this through exercise and treatment.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Happy Father's Day #fathersday #happyfamily ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook